AAC Technology

Xella Aircrete North America, Inc. produces AAC from abundant, all natural materials, including Portland cement, lime, water, sand, gypsum and aluminum paste, that result in a green, sustainable product. Xella’s Hebel Aerated Concrete plant, located in Adel, GA, is currently the largest industrial aerated concrete plant in North America with an annual production capacity of 175,000 cubic meters.

Dimensional Accuracy

Dimensional Accuracy

After the cake has cured, it is removed from the mould and cut with thin wires, similar to piano strings, to each product’s specifications. The wires cleanly cut the block, providing 90-degree angles and straight sides with ASTM tolerances (about 1/16 of an inch). Material cut from the cake is collected, mixed and incorporated into the return slurry – nothing is wasted in AAC production.

Strength and Durability

Strength and Durability

Once the blocks/panels are properly sized, they move to the autoclaves that pressurize and steam the blocks for up to 12 hours (pressure = 160 to 170 psi, temperature = 360 to 380° F). This curing process creates AAC’s strength and durability. By pressurizing the material in its green state, the AAC is forced to cure quickly over a short amount of time, thus reducing the need for curing on the jobsite.

Jobsite Speed and Accuracy

Jobsite Speed and Accuracy

To complete the production process, the panels are stamped and labeled according to a project’s AAC Panel Layout Drawing and packaged according to the sequence of installation and shipped to the specific job sites. All products are stamped and labeled according to ASTM and UL guidelines.

Green and Sustainable

The manufacturing process of AAC emits no pollutants, no VOC’s and creates no toxic by-products, and all materials can be recycled for other uses. In its green, cake-like state, excess material is re-routed back to production. The finished, cured AAC can be crushed and used for cat litter, oil absorbent or road bed. The amount of energy used to produce material is lower relative to the volume of the material produced, one component of the six areas considered for LEED certification.